Q20- Israel versus Hamas and Hezbollah: Lessons(?) in Relationship Capital

Let us apply the expanded KM framework to the conflict between Israel on the one hand and Hamas and Hezbollah on the other hand.

Below I reproduce in the upper diagram the expanded KM framework, while the lower diagram shows which metacapitals the Israeli war machinery is hitting Hamas and Hezbollah, and which metacapitals are the strength of Hamas and Hezbollah. Note that Hamas and Hezbollah are more than just fighting groups, more so they provide or they ARE community development and support systems (relationship capital) intensely motivated by their particular but strong religious beliefs (motivational factor).

israel-vs-hamas-and-hezbollah1

What do we notice?

  • The Israeli armed forces are not only missing the areas of strengths of Hamas and Hezbollah, their conventional military offensives are likely to be further strengthening them. The latest “disproportional” Israeli offensive in Gaza may have created the motivational energy to spawn one more generation of Palestinian suicide bombers!
  • Conventional military means that seek to kill people (human capital) and destroy infrastructures (tangible assets) are utterly inappropriate to deal with an adversary whose strength and means of warfare are elsewhere: on strong network or sense of community (relational capital) and on strong belief or ideology (motivational factor). Killing a terrorist does not kill what inspires more terrorists to volunteer. Cruise missiles and aircraft carriers cannot defeat terrorism. In blog post Q18 I wrote how a smaller and less militarily and economically powerful Vietnam defeated its foe, the United States, who had superior technology and war machinery: an example of stronger motivational factor and relational capital overcoming tangible assets no matter how superior!
  • Conventional military doctrine is inappropriate in the context of “clash of civilizations”.
  • Conventional military doctrine may eventually be seen as counter-productive in a shrinking world where human groups need to learn to live together in diversity but peace and harmony.

What’s in your mind now? Please share it by clicking the “Comment” link below and converting your tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge for more people to see.

=>Back to main page of Apin Talisayon’s Weblog
=>Jump to Clickable Master Index

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

4 Responses to “Q20- Israel versus Hamas and Hezbollah: Lessons(?) in Relationship Capital”

  1. Topics about Airplanes » Archive » Q20- Israel versus Hamas and Hezbollah: Lessons(?) in Relational Capital Says:

    […] Apin Talisayon’s Weblog placed an interesting blog post on Q20- Israel versus Hamas and Hezbollah: Lessons(?) in Relational CapitalHere’s a brief overviewLet us apply the expanded KM framework to the conflict between Israel on the one hand and Hamas and Hezbollah on the other hand. Below I reproduce in the upper diagram the expanded KM framework , while the lower diagram shows which metacapitals the Israeli war machinery is hitting Hamas and Hezbollah, and which metacapitals are the strength of Hamas and Hezbollah. Note that Hamas and Hezbollah are more than just fighting groups, more so they provide or they ARE community development […]

  2. Lennon Babilonia Says:

    Good evening, sir.

    You’re right, sir that conventional warfare is not really appropriate in confronting Hamas and Hezbollah. Conventional military doctrine applies only to conventional forces – that is those forces recognized (and created) by the government – and normally governments only have one armed forces, like the AFP for the Philippines. These conventional forces follow internationally accepted ways of fighting a war against another conventional force. As such, the rules of engagement, international human rights, red cross policies, and other internationally accepted laws are observed by these forces. With this, i think that conventional military doctrine is not counter-productive.

    Hamas and Hezbollah, like the rest of other groups fighting a conventional force, however, are not following these international laws and they are not mandated by any entities to do so – they are what we call unconventional forces. Terrorrists, insurgents, and other unconventional forces are fighting on the basis of their ideology which cannot be defeated by killing people and destroying buildings. Only ideas can kill ideas. The Israel Military, as a conventional force being watched by the international community, has its hands tied behind by fighting an unconventional force. But they, too, are learning from this experience. As we all know, their years of exposure to wars has been against forces who are also following the rules of war. While in the eyes of the media they are losing this war, i am pretty sure that they are learning their lessons well in rewriting their doctrines on fighting an unconventional foe.

    On the relational capital, yes i fully agree that Hamas and Hezbollah are gaining great grounds on this aspect. Insurgents’ life depends on the people, on the mass base. Win the people and you win the war. It is on this particular area that the Israel Military should improve their capability – win the hearts and minds of the people.

  3. apintalisayon Says:

    Hi Lenon, I am surprised and glad to know you follow my blog. And Q20 is just the topic to draw out an expert in military doctrine, defense innovations, and military R&D!

    Yes, I agree “only ideas can kill ideas.” My former boss and revered mentor, Gen. Almonte said, “it takes a superior ideology to defeat another ideology.”

    I wonder, what could be that superior ideology?

    Thanks Lenon.

  4. lennon babilonia Says:

    Hello Sir.

    Yes, until now we are wondering also what could be that superior ideology in our case. More than 20 years of fighting an internal war and still cannot find the perfect solution.

    I remember in one of my readings that there are only two forces that can unite a country, one is thru fear and the other is common interest. Both we don’t have!

    Israel and Singapore, i believe, share the same fear of being overpowered by their neigboring countries (Malaysia in the case of Singapore). With this, all their efforts are geared towards uniting as one against this threat.

    Have a happy weekend, sir.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: